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microtrend alert! Scripted

October 23, 2017

The written word has been making an appearance on runways and in photos of street style recently.  It has been shown on everything from ballgowns to sweatshirts and has also been spotted on accessories.  

 

images left to right:  POLYCHROME  | Yohji Yamamoto  |  Oscar de la Renta 

At its heart the scripted trend is not so new; logos and phrases have long been emblazoning high-end fashion as a status symbol of sorts.  It was also a clever ploy on the part of brands to have the clients themselves do some advertising and establish a stronger brand recognition - and clients are footing the bill, too! In the early 90's graffiti embellished pieces made a splash. Not only was this a nod to how much streetwear and hip-hop were beginning to influence runways, but it was also a way to democratize the designer logos that had proliferated in the 80's.  Putting graffiti on clothes took the high-end edge from markings and made them accessible to the masses to some degree.

If runways and style-setters are on track, though, this trend is ready for a resurgence and it will be interesting to see how it gets reinterpreted.  There are lots of examples of this trend being addressed as embroidered embellishments, especially on denim.  In addition, there are scribbles and brushstrokes as well as spray painted versions in printing.  The phrases we have been seeing are an update from what has been done in the past.  Cheeky slogans, taglines, and personal phrases join the more typical designer names and logos.  The politically charged atmosphere of late also leaves a lot of opportunity for expression. All of these factors will allow for a fresh take on this kind of motif.

 

 

click through the gallery of examples of the scripted trend:

 

images left to right from top:  Love Letter  | Zero  + Maria Cornejo  |  Yohji Yamamoto  | They All Hate Us Swedish School of Textiles  |  Tory Burch  |  Pull & Bear  |  Oscar de la Renta  |  Thunder Script  |  Liam Hodges  |  Dance Graffiti |  IQ+Berlin 

 

For some more examples of this motif in fashion, take a look at our research board on Pinterest.

 

How will you be addressing this versatile and eye-catching trend?  We would love to know how you will incorporate it into your collection!

 

 

 

 

Sources:  Vogue | Elle | The Impression | My Classico  

* We intend no copyright infringement by displaying images from other sources on our site.  Unless otherwise noted, all images are the property of their respective owners.

 

 

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